The World War I Diary of Albert Huet

Author: Hélène Huet
Faculty Mentor: N/A

Abstract:

This poster focuses on: translating and mapping the digitized diary of Albert Huet, which recounts his experience as a WWI soldier between 1916 and 1918. Using StoryMapJS from Knightlab to connect each location to a specific page in the diary and provide short French and English explanations of what occurred at these locations. Tracing the use of this resource as a primary source text in History courses across the US.
Research Types: Faculty/Staff

Website 2

8 Responses

  1. I appreciate how easy this poster is to read, and I like how they took his diary and standardized the French and then put it in English. I feel like having it in both languages ensures that no detail of Albert’s story is lost in translation. I also love how they made a story map that connects every page of the diary to a specific location to really ensure the full story is told.

  2. I also found the poster -and research it presents- accessible and engaging, thank you! It’s exciting that your work is used in classrooms all over the country, congratulations!

  3. An exceptional poster! The diary pages and digital mapping are great resources for a French history or civilization course. The hand-written diary pages are so evocative and can help us understand how the Great War was experienced by the soldiers who fought.

  4. This is a fabulous combination of historical text, a personal diary, images (of both the diary author and the diary pages), and maps of locations mentioned. I love of rich this presentation of history is and found it to draw me in so much more than a simple textual history would have.

  5. Very well done and engaging. Provides information in various modalities and like how you’ve rescued this story and grounded it for all to see.

  6. This is a wonderful idea to connect intimate journal entries to the larger story of WWI and place the stories in a visual way with the map. Beautiful project!

  7. The shear simplicity of this poster, along with the amount of information it puts forward, is quite satisfying. The conciseness of it allowed for a seamless reading. It’s fascinating seeing the individual pages and entries from his journal mapped out onto France and the area, and how it provides additional context when looked at from the view of the war at large.

  8. The transcription of this project is very impressive. The website itself is very clean and accessible, and I love how readers can quickly compare different transcriptions and images, but also isolate the version they want to look at. I wonder, how was the website coded?

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